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WORKS AND TECHNICAL SERVICES

The District Vision

A healthy - well educated, productive and prosperous community.

The District Mission

 To deliver quality service to the people of Buliisa so as to promote equitable and sustainable social economic development.

 Strategic Objectives

 The overall goal of the district is to improve the social economic being of the people, and it will be attained through the following strategic objectives:

 Works and Technical Services

Sector Goals

 a)       To Make Buliisa District Road Network motorable at all times

b)      

To improve building infrastructure through new construction and maintenance of the existing

Sectoral Objectives

Works and Technical Services

 a)       To reduce time of travel on the road

b)      

To reduce vehicle maintenance cost

c)      

To improve the linkage of all social infrastructure

d)      

To increase the percentage of motorable feeder roads by 80% by 2020.

e)      

All existing building infrastructure is maintained

f)       

All building infrastructure to be planned

g)      

To improve safe water coverage by 20% by 2020.

h)      

To improve latrine coverage by 30% by 2020.

Staffing:

The sector is Politically headed by Hon Fred Lukumu, the District Chairperson who doubles as the Sec for Works and Technical services.

Hon Fred Lukumu, (Standing) Sec for works addressing atakeholders on key issues

The Sector is Technically headed overall by the District Engineer Mr Asiimwe Siraj

The Water sub sector is headed by Engineer Muhambura Stephen.

 

 

Enginner Muhambura Stepen, the Ag. District Water Officer Buliisa.

Road Infrastructure:

Buliisa District has a total of 373 kms of gazzeted road network  of which 162 kms are Trunk roads, 85 kms are Feeder roads and the remaining 126 kms are Community Access Roads.

Most of Buliisa Feeder and Community roads are characterised by sandy soft soils across low lying areas, Inadequate Gravel on steep gradients, Heavy bushes which grow very fast even after cutting them and Inadequate cross drains.

Table 1: Roads by type and length

S/No.

Road Type

No. of kms

Condition

1.

Tarmac road

2

Fair

2.

Trunk road

160

Some sections bad

3.

Feeder roads

85

Fair

4.

Community Access

112

Fair

5.

Urban roads

14

Good

 

Total

373

 

Water Sub Sector

Introduction

 This sub-section provides a concise overview of the different water sources used by the communities in the District and their management.

In February 2014, a team of UBOS officials in collaboration with district staff collected data at village level on the various water sources namely: public stand taps, springs/wells, boreholes, public water tanks, valley dams, rivers, lakes and gravity flow schemes.

For each water source, data collected established the status i.e. functionality and reliability. Information was also compiled about the existence of water user committees and whether they had women among the members.

The National Water Policy

 The National Water Policy of 1999 seeks to promote “a new integrated approach to manage the water resources in ways that are sustainable and most beneficial to the people of Uganda”

Two of the key policy directives include: “integrated and sustainable, development, management and use of the national water resources, with the full participation of all stakeholders” and “sustainable provision of clean safe water within easy reach and good hygienic sanitation practices and facilities, based on management responsibility and ownership by the users, within decentralized governance”.

 

Water Management at District Level

 The Local Governments (Districts, Town Councils and Sub Counties) are empowered by the Local Governments Act (2000) to provide water services and manage the Environment and Natural Resource base.

At the District level, Water Offices are headed by the District Water Officer who manages water and sanitation developments and oversees the operation and maintenance of existing water supplies in the District in line with the national policy.

The DWO is assisted by the Assistant District Water Officer In Charge of Sanitation Mr Sabiiti Titus, together with the Assistant District Water Officer In Charge of Mobilization CDO Mr Dison

Community Level Participation

Since water is life and the most important stimuli to economic development both at local and national level, community participation is paramount.

Communities are responsible for demanding, planning, contributing cash and in kind towards operating and maintaining rural water supply and sanitation facilities.

This is done through Water User Committees (WUC), which are sometimes referred to as Water and Sanitation Committee (WSC) and they are required to be established at each water point.

Table 2 shows that Buliisa District had 71 safe water sources with functional water user committees.

Buliisa Sub County had the highest percentage (52.6) of water sources with FUC, followed by Ngwedo Sub County at 31.1 percent while Butiaba Sub County had the least percentage of 18.2. All the functional water user committees comprised of both men and women, gender sensitive.

 Table 2: Number of Safe Water Sources with Water User Committees by Sub County

Sub County

Total No of Safe Water Sources

Water Sources with WUC

% of Water Sources with WUC

Biiso

74

19

25.7

Buliisa

19

10

52.6

Buliisa TC

20

6

30.0

Butiaba

22

4

18.2

Kigwera

15

4

26.7

Kihungya

53

14

26.4

Ngwedo

45

14

31.1

Total

248

71

28.6

Source: CIS 2014

Safe water sources

The MWE categorizes water sources into two i.e. the safe water sources and the non-safe water sources.

The safe water sources are ideal for human consumption. According to the MWE, the safe water sources include: Boreholes, protected springs, shallow wells fitted with hand pumps, RWH facilities (storage >6m3) and piped water supplies.

The MWE also stipulates the number of users per source: Protected springs – 200; shallow well with hand pump – 300; deep borehole with hand pump – 300; gravity flow scheme communal tap or other piped water communal tap – 150.

The Coverage for rainwater harvesting (RWH) depends on the volume of the tank.

Table 2. shows that Buliisa District had 75 public stand taps, 40 protected springs/wells, 131 functional boreholes and only two (2) public water tanks.

Boreholes were the most common safe water sources, representing about 53 percent of all the safe water sources in the District. Buliisa S/C had only 19 functional boreholes: it didn’t have any other type of water source. 

This is a risky situation to the communities in case the ground water dries up. Protected springs/wells were in Biiso, Kihungya and Ngwedo Sub Counties.

Access / coverage refer to the percentage of people that collect water from an improved water source.

The national target coverage for safe water set by the MWE is 77 percent for rural and 100 percent for urban for the financial year 2014/15.

Table 2 depicts that the District average safe water coverage was 62 percent an indication that some people may not be accessing safe water or they are travelling long distances in search of safe water.

Biiso and Kihungya Sub Counties had coverage of more than 90 percent and this could have been due to a bigger number of functional protected springs, shallow wells, boreholes and Busingiro GFS. 

Buliisa, Butiaba and Kigwera Sub Counties had very low coverage of less than 50 percent which was far below the District average coverage.  

Table 2.29: Safe Water Coverage by Sub County

Sub County

Est. popn using safe water

 Total Popn

%ge Coverage

Biiso

17,206

17,983

                             95.7

Buliisa

7,350

17,047

                             43.1

Buliisa T/C

5,614

7,677

                             73.1

Butiaba

12,900

29,214

                             44.2

Kigwera

6,600

14,024

                             47.1

Kihungya

11,400

12,311

                             92.6

Ngwedo

10,406

17,250

                             60.3

Total

71,476

115,506

                             61.9

Source: CIS 2014

Functionality and Reliability

The national functionality of water supplies is defined as the “percentage of improved water facilities found functional and reliable at the time of spot check”, and the national set target is 90% by 2015.

Table 2.30 shows that, the functionality and reliability of safe water sources stood at 87.1 percent which was slightly below the set national target of 90 percent.

Reliability in Buliisa T/C, Buliisa and Butiaba Sub Counties was at 100 percent because they had only two categories of water sources i.e. public stand taps and boreholes which could have been well maintained by the community.

Kigwera S/C had the least percentage (73%) of functional and reliable water sources because one third of its boreholes were functional but not reliable.

 Table 2.30: Number of functional and reliable safe water sources by Sub County

Sub County

Public stand taps

Wells/Springs

Boreholes

Public Water Tanks

Total No of SWS

Total reliable

% Reliable

Total No

No reliable

Protected

Reliable

Functional

Reliable

Biiso

20

16

17

14

36

30

1

74

60

81.1

Buliisa

0

0

0

0

19

19

0

19

19

100.0

Buliisa T/C

11

11

0

0

9

9

0

20

20

100.0

Butiaba

18

18

0

0

4

4

0

22

22

100.0

Kigwera

6

5

0

0

9

6

0

15

11

73.3

Kihungya

4

2

19

16

30

24

0

53

42

79.2

Ngwedo

16

12

4

3

24

27

1

45

42

93.3

Total

75

64

40

33

131

119

2

248

216

87.1

Non Safe Water Sources

The non-safe water sources are sources considered not safe for human consumption, they are prone to contamination from foreign particles and can easily cause morbidity when taken untreated. This category includes: unprotected springs/wells, valley dams/ponds, rivers and lakes among others. 

Additional data by Hannington Health Inspector Buliisa HSD

 

Additional .